Non-Clinical Support

Non clinical support covers a wide range of health services that do not involve clinical training like nurses and doctors. They may work in public or private hospitals, in rest homes, people’s homes or in communities such as schools, marae, sports clubs or churches.

Non-Clinical Support Worker

Non clinical support covers a wide range of health services that do not involve clinical training like nurses and doctors. They may work in public or private hospitals, in rest homes, people’s homes or in communities such as schools, marae, sports clubs or churches.

Examples of non-clinical support workers include:

Personal Carer for the Elderly or Disabled

Helps older and disabled people with housework in their own homes. Also give emotional support, care and companionship for older and disabled people in their homes.

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Child Care Worker

Looks after and educates young children in their own home or in an early childhood centres such as kindergartens, playschools, Kohanga reo etc.

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Hospital Orderly

Orderlies have a very important role in public and private hospitals. They support the doctors and nurses by moving patients, all sorts of equipment and supplies around the hospital. Orderlies make sure meals are delivered to all patients in the hospital at meal times.

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Health Care Assistants, Hospital based

Very important workers who assist nurses with a variety of things for patients in the hospital. These range from making/changing beds, helping with showering and toileting and helping patients with other personal needs they may have while in hospital.

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Therapy Aide

Therapy Aides help specially trained therapists such as Diversional Therapist’s, Occupational Therapist’s and Physiotherapist’s, to look after patients with non-clinical support. This could include helping patients who are learning to walk or helping people to dress or undress.

Health & Welfare

Health and Welfare workers also cover a wide range of support for patients who are unable to care for themselves. As well as working with individuals who need health care and their whanau, health and welfare workers also work with groups such as youth, whanau, people with disabilities and Maori.

Positions in Health and Welfare

Kaimahi Hauora / Kaiawhina / Community Health Workers

These workers also cover a wide range of jobs that involve working with patients and whanau in hospital and community settings such as in people’s homes, in schools, kura, kohanga, marae, clubs etc.

A Kaimahi Hauora based in a hospital setting supports Maori patients in the hospital and also make sure they have the support they need when they leave hospital. Because Maori are often quite shy when they come into hospital, Kaimahi Hauora will approach them to find out if they need any help with for example, understanding what’s wrong with them, understanding what doctors and nurses are saying, whether they would like karakia and helping whanau from out of town to get temporary accommodation while the patient is in hospital. Hospital based kaimahi will also ask hospital staff questions on behalf of the patient and interpret patients needs on their behalf.

Kaiawhina and Community Health Workers do a similar job outside of the hospital setting. Their job is to help individuals and whanau get the health services they need, when they need them. This covers a wide range of areas such as working with GP’s (non-hospital doctors) health education services, nursing services, health services for children, support for people who are having problems with drugs or alcohol.

Kaimahi Hauora, Kaiawhina and Community Health Workers are usually but not always Maori, be willing and able to learn about Maori health issues and be able to relate well to people, especially Maori. Ability to korero Maori is an advantage but not essential. The majority of Kaimahi Hauora / Kaiawhina / Community Health Workers work in the primary health sector, i.e. in non-hospital and non-specialist services.

Youth Worker

Works with people under 25 years of age and their families. They help young people with a range of supports that usually involve building good positive relationships within their own community.

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Social workers

Social workers are specially trained people who provide advice, advocacy and support to people with personal and social problems. They also help with community and social issues.

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Ambulance Officer/Paramedic

Ambulance officers are usually first to respond to 111 emergency situations like accidents, heart attacks, asthma attacks etc. Ambulance Officers are trained in First Aid as they work to ‘stabilise’ patients if they are seriously hurt or ill until they can be taken to the nearest hospital or clinic. Ambulance Officers are trained to use first aid equipment. Ambulance officers may also train to a higher level as ‘Paramedics’. Paramedics are specially trained people that are able to provide a higher level of clinical support to patients in emergency situations. Ambulance Officers receive special driving and road safety training as they usually need to get to places quickly.

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